Oregon Slaughters Seals So Salmon Still Survive

Won’t see this nonsense in Oregon.
Seal Posse Red Sign

The sea lion population has steadily increased in the last several decades, but it has come with a cost, one being paid by already imperiled stocks of steelhead and salmon.

“The steelhead have a 90 percent extinction risk if nothing changes,” says Shaun Clements, a biologist and senior policy analyst with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Which is why Oregon has taken the drastic step of actively culling – segregating and euthanizing – certain individual sea lions.

Oregon Slaughters Seals So Salmon Still Survive

Seals Off To Good Start, Expect More Sharks

Mister Jaws

Akeman and her husband visit the seals almost daily and track their numbers, conducting a Harbor Seal Census annually. This year the pair are predicting 55-60 live births based on how things are going with Koala and her pup and their count on pregnant moms.

2018 was a very good year for the colony and Baynet recorded 70 births. The population has been in recovery mode since 2014 when changing ocean temperatures in the bay depleted food sources. In 2016 just 16 pups were born in the Monterey area.

Seals Off To Good Start, Expect More Sharks

Seals Not Having A Peaceful Place To Birth Pups

Maybe all the nosy Seal Posse people are scaring them off

Volunteers with Baynet are reporting people disturbing the animals at the Hopkins Beach Rookery in an off limits area.

The animals are very skittish and will flee the beach if spooked by human activity.

“Right now we’ve got some pretty delicate situations among the harbor seals, there are a lot of pregnancies,” said Thom Akeman with Baynet.

The fear is people on the beach will scare mom off of the beach, either before delivery or after, leaving her separated from baby.

Akeman said it has already happened twice this year.

“We had two seal pups born over the weekend in rocks, while that is normal for harbor seals, that is not normal for this colony,” he said.

The harbor seals at Hopkins Beach usually deliver pups in the sand where it is easier and more protected. Akeman thinks these two moms may have been scared off the beach by people.

Seals Not Having A Peaceful Place To Birth Pups

Newcomer Acheman’s Seal Posse Reports Drop In Seals

Wonder why.

Hungry Alien Sharks

According to a population census taken on Nov. 25 by husband and wife Thom and Kim Akeman, volunteers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association’s shoreline program Bay Net, the Pacific Grove Harbor seal population has declined by one-third. Numbers have plunged from about 700 individuals, based on preliminary counts taken by Monterey Bay Aquarium researcher Teri Nicholson in the 1990s, to fewer than 500 in the last couple of years, the Akemans reported. Uncharacteristically warm waters, which depleted the marine environment of oxygen and food, are to blame, they added.

Newcomer Acheman’s Seal Posse Reports Drop In Seals

Fewer Seals Sighted Sunning On Shore

Tired of being watched so the went to Pismo?

Hungry Alien Sharks

People along the coast in Pacific Grove have been asking where all the seals have gone. According to a new census report, at least a third of the harbor seals along the Monterey Peninsula have disappeared.

Seal experts said it is hard to know how many of the missing seals are actually dead, but studies show that at least 40 disappear from the Monterey Peninsula colony each year.

“Particularly for the harbor seals if you come up to this fence you don’t want to go above the fence line. They take that as a threat and they will immediately vacate the beach. So we want to control that stress level because they’re already dealing with a lot,” said Kim Akeman.

Fewer Seals Sighted Sunning On Shore

Fear Of Seals – Man Sets Off Bomb To Scare Them Away

Didn’t he think he was safe from seals two miles from the ocean?

The small bomb, usually used to scare off seals, went off near a hardware store and a gas station on Forest Avenue near Forest Hill Boulevard at 9 p.m. An officer in the area heard a loud bang. A resident told him a man had lit and thrown an explosive device near a gas station.

Michael Harley Henderson, a 28-year-old Pacific Grove resident, was located at a nearby liquor store and admitted to detonating the “seal bomb” and throwing a second unlit bomb into a trash can. The small cylinder-shaped bombs are about 3 inches long, police said.

Fear Of Seals – Man Sets Off Bomb To Scare Them Away

Great White Shark Population Boom

Great White Shark

Could it be the result of all those tasty otters and sea lions that are also protected?

“White sharks can’t be fished or targeted or taken both by state and federal laws so these regulations give them the opportunity to reproduce and increase in population,” said David Ebert, director for the Pacific Shark Research Center at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories.

Great White Shark Population Boom

No Drones Over Hopkins

Says the S.S. even though their own graphic shows that the P.G. shoreline is not in the restricted zone.

Drone Flights-over-monterey-bay-sanctuary-draw-warning

Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Superintendent Paul Michel, who yesterday issued a press release warning that unmanned aircraft systems—aka quadcopters or aerial drones—are regulated, and in some places banned, above sanctuary waters.
Low-flying planes over the beaches and ocean, piloted or not, can scare marine wildlife such as seals, sea otters, seabirds and shorebirds, Michel writes.

Even outside those areas, he adds, it’s illegal to harass marine animals, turtles and birds. In various direct and indirect ways, the presence of drones can stress and even kill wildlife.

Would Thom Akemans’s presence frighten the mammals? Will they ban him too?

No Drones Over Hopkins

Seals Taking Over The P.G. Shorelines

The city’s Beautification and Natural Resources Committee submitted a report to the Pacific Grove City Council on Wednesday noting that Pacific harbor seals are crowding the west beach of Hopkins Marine Station and, in 2006, some mother seals used the beach west of Fifth Street to bear pups.

All recommended that the city establish a plan to keep the seals off the beach. Once ashore and pupping, the experts said, the seals own it.

The policy, they said, should discourage “haul-outs” by seals by chasing them back to sea if they come out of the water, by banging on pots and pans, using other noisemakers, scarecrows and human presence.

Be careful when you ask for radical conservation and nature preservation, you just might find yourself banned from your own public beaches.

Here’s a suggestion:
Seals And Bag Pipes

Seals Taking Over The P.G. Shorelines