Toilet To The Tap Water Credits Not Usable For New Hotels?

Better idea: bypass all the complicated water credit issues and send that toilet water straight to the new hotels.

Toilet to Tap

So it must have been a shock to P.G. City Manager Ben Harvey to receive a letter from the state water board on May 16, stating that the board was holding back on the payment because the city’s plan might be a breach of contract.

The issue appears to be a discrepancy of interpretations stemming from the water board’s 2009 order to the Monterey Peninsula to stop using water from the Carmel River. One interpretation is that due to the order, P.G. cannot keep any new water credits for itself – they all have to go back to the river.

Toilet To The Tap Water Credits Not Usable For New Hotels?

Mayor Kampe Not Running For Re-Election

Grumpycat Good

Better find a decent pick for mayor before P.G. starts to look like Stockton.

He won in a landslide, and the four-year adventure turned into a 10-year journey, after winning the mayor’s seat two more times in 2014 and 2016.

The journey is now officially coming to an end, Kampe announced Tuesday, May 29, in an emailed statement.

He and his wife, Cheryl, are ready to do new things together, which they have postponed during this stint on the council.

Oh, and one steps up in favor turning P.G. into Stockton

Councilmember Rudy Fischer announced later the same day that he is running for mayor.
He said as mayor he would “pretty much continue the council’s current policies and direction.”

Mayor Kampe Not Running For Re-Election

Brewpubs Will Be The New Bistros

Will the landmark sign still remain? Easy directions to Fandango – west on Lighthouse and turn at the maxipad,
Maxipad Sign

Cohen goes on to say that gyms and real estate offices produce no sales tax. How long did it take to notice that? We have art galleries that are open eight hours a week. Clothing boutiques open by appointment. How much tax and foot traffic do they bring in?

Prime retail spots were suddenly snapped up by real estate offices and a physical therapy business, meaning no sales tax revenue for the city, and fewer shops to draw visitors and residents to the neighborhood.

“There’s nothing wrong with these businesses, but the problem is they don’t produce any sales tax,” Cohen says. “They could be put on side streets. They don’t have to take up valuable retail space.”

The Economic Development Commission voted 8-0 in October in favor of limiting how many offices, real estate agencies, medical clinics and gyms could occupy first-floor locations on Lighthouse Avenue. The move is not without precedent: After a spate of thrift shop and consignment store openings a few years ago, the commission and others convinced the City Council to pass an ordinance in 2015 limiting the number to two thrift shops on Lighthouse, and 12 total downtown.

Brewpubs Will Be The New Bistros

Newcomer Akeman Wants Less Newcomers

I felt the same way 30 years ago when Ache-man the news reporter moved here and wrote articles and later an instruction manual for moving to the area. The man does not realize he’s been part of the problem all along,

Tom Acheman

“There are times it’s like living in an airport terminal,” Thom Akeman says of the sounds of rolling luggage and loud voices of vacationers on his street located near downtown. Akeman served on a subcommittee that advised the city before last year’s revision, but he says residents’ concerns were not adequately considered.

Newcomer Akeman Wants Less Newcomers

Mvsevum Rewrites History

It’s not about nature anymore. It’s another friggin’ art gallery and substainable reeducation camp.

The Mvsevm

They come from a revisit of the strategic plan by the board, staff and volunteers (though, strangely, no direct input from the public), and set to go before city officials for approval.

Much of the implementation is guided by Juan Govea, the museum’s new director of exhibits and education, who formerly taught biology at Salinas High School for 11 years.

“The role of museums are changing,” he says. “We are making some adjustments to be more valuable to the community… building and adding to create a more rich user experience.”

They’ve moved the 20-year-old interactive whale exhibit out, squeezed the gift shop into that space, installed paintings of the Monterey Bay Plein Air Painters Association in the gallery, and moved the Chinese village exhibit to a recessed arm off the lobby.

Mvsevum Rewrites History

S.F. Chronicle Schlocks Pacific Grove

Credited to a Mark C. Anderson. Is that one and the same as the editor of the Coast Weakly? Must be why the list of places to leave money at looks like an accounts receivable for ads roster from the same tabloid.

Check this one out – the expert flubs the location in the article. Where is Grove Avenue any way?

Midday
Arm thyself for a picnic on the water at Grove Market and Pavel’s Backerei, two institutions that sit opposite each other on classic small-town drive Grove Avenue. Deli sandwiches, fine cheeses and classic counter service beckon at the timeless neighborhood market; celebrated chocolate-bellied croissants, superior breads and cream-cheese danishes await at Pavel’s, if they haven’t sold out.

S.F. Chronicle Schlocks Pacific Grove

$50 Per Month Sewer Bills Proposed

By Tom Fruitcheese and the Monterey Peninsula Water Pollution Creation Agency. Protesters tried to stop it with a written campaign but fell short, kind of knee deep in the sewage.

The city’s aging sewer system has led to repeat sewage spills into protected coastal waters. Officials sought the fee hike to cover the long-term costs of repairing it, pinned at $13.9 million over 10 years.
“Portions of the sewer system are almost 100 years old,” P.G. City Manager Tom Frutchey writes by email. “In order to keep the system functioning effectively, for the safety of residents and the protection of the Bay, the council adopted the proposed rates. Throughout the 10-year period, future councils will be able to make further adjustments.”
Meanwhile, the Monterey Peninsula Taxpayers Association has pressured the city to refund a $600,000-plus sewer fee overcharge to residents. Officials have said they’d rather apply it as a credit against the upcoming fee hike.

$50 Per Month Sewer Bills Proposed

That Sewer Internet? Oh It’s On The Way

Google TISP

Another bad decision by Tom Fruit-Cheese. Why would Comcast or ATT want to use SiFi Networks’ fiber cables in sewers when they already have their own? Who wants to work on cables soaking in poop? And what happens when the  Monterey Regional Water Pollution Creation Agency breaks a valve? Does the internet go out or just ooze sewage into your computer?

In a revised deal still under negotiation, City Manager Tom Frutchey says, SiFi would construct and install the network. Internet service providers such as AT&T and Comcast would pay the city for each customer who signs up, he says, and the city in turn would use that money to lease the system from SiFi for 30 years. When the term is up, the city would own the system. According to staff calculations, P.G. would net $1 million over 10 years.

Pacific Grove City Council made a deal with London-based SiFi Networks to install fiber-optic Internet cables through the city’s sewer pipes. The company announced it had selected P.G. as a California “FiberCity,” intended to showcase speeds of up to 1 gigabyte per second – 20 times faster than the fastest DSL connection – and the network would be installed by the end of 2015. SiFi would cover the construction costs, up to $40 million.

That Sewer Internet? Oh It’s On The Way

Cedar Street Timeworn Owner Bankrupt

Cedar St Timeworn

According to the Weakly.

Marge Ann Wimpee, also known as Marge Ann Jameson, editor of P.G.’s Cedar Street Times, is filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Among her biggest creditors: The Pacific Grove Hometown Bulletin, The Salinas Californian and The Register-Pajaronian.
According to filings with U.S. Bankruptcy Court, Jameson has almost $133,000 in unsecured debt. The big media creditors: Pacific Grove Hometown Bulletin, Inc. ($45,000); the Pajaronian($19,000) and the Californian ($17,000).
Jameson lists her monthly net income as $475 and values her personal property at $50,000. Most of that, $44,000, is tied up in Cedar Street stocks, interests and accounts receivable.
Jameson responds by email: “It’s a Chapter 13… no one’s business but mine and the creditors.”
Former Bulletin co-owner Xavier Maruyama says he and Edie McDonald sold Jameson the paper in 2013 for about $70,000. Jameson made the first payment of about $30,000, Maruyama says, but hasn’t paid since. “We had to sue her,” he says. “We found out we’re third in line.”

Cedar Street Timeworn Owner Bankrupt

No Drones Over Hopkins

Says the S.S. even though their own graphic shows that the P.G. shoreline is not in the restricted zone.

Drone Flights-over-monterey-bay-sanctuary-draw-warning

Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Superintendent Paul Michel, who yesterday issued a press release warning that unmanned aircraft systems—aka quadcopters or aerial drones—are regulated, and in some places banned, above sanctuary waters.
Low-flying planes over the beaches and ocean, piloted or not, can scare marine wildlife such as seals, sea otters, seabirds and shorebirds, Michel writes.

Even outside those areas, he adds, it’s illegal to harass marine animals, turtles and birds. In various direct and indirect ways, the presence of drones can stress and even kill wildlife.

Would Thom Akemans’s presence frighten the mammals? Will they ban him too?

No Drones Over Hopkins