P.G. Police Blotter 2/25/03

Week of February 25, 2003

Suspicious circumstance–white male sitting in a red Honda next to school playground. Determined to be school janitor on break.

Injury incident–Central and 19th. Green 95 Sable and green Camry. Both vehicles towed. First vehicle ran stop sign and collided with second vehicle. Driver in second vehicle taken to CHOMP.

Embezzlement–former employee of 12th St. church withdrew $5,000 from a church account without authorization.

Battery report–being hit by step father. Step-father arrested and released on bail. Standby for placement of children.

Close patrol– estranged daughter and son-in-law vandalized home interior of relative before moving out. Owner fears their return; locks to be changed promptly.

Shoplifters–fleeing from store. Two taken into custody.

Raccoon problem–Grove Acre.

Suspicious person–reported tearing down signs on Arkwright.

Citizen contact–tourist with bucket wading through tidepools. Stopped activity before any violations.

MC violation–white female feeding peanuts to seagulls. Warning cite issued.

Suspicious circumstances–report of white male, 17, loading rifle into car. Was taking possession of BB gun from friend.

Malicious mischief–unknown juveniles ignited can of hairspray on tennis court. Fled on foot.

Road hazard–complaint of large sinkhole in roadway. CalAm called, as water was the cause. Barricades erected for safety.

Armed robbery–suspect arrested, gun and $1,427 cash recovered.

Morrie Fisher, Mayor With A Badge

Creepy old guy tries to pick up women using a tin star.

Mayor Badge

Former police chief Scott Miller says he had several pointed discussions with city manager Hubbard over the impropriety of providing the mayor and council with badges, and refused to place the badge order, leaving Hubbard to do so himself.

In Miller’s view, there is no practical reason for politicians and other non-police to have badges. He says that having a badge, particularly in a wallet, is only designed to get out of tickets or otherwise attempt to influence law enforcement officials to “give them a break because of the badge.”

Hubbard told Miller the justification for the mayor and council members to have badges was in the event of a natural disaster, where they were outside of the city limits and the city had been cut off from the outside world, council members could use the badges to influence police to let them through the perimeter.

On Monday, July 14th, there was apparently a natural disaster in the making at the Mission Ranch restaurant and bar in Carmel.

A woman, who will be identified as Sandy, was sitting at the bar waiting for a table. While waiting, she and her three female friends were contacted by an individual whom she characterized as an older gentleman sitting alone at the bar. He initiated a conversation with them, and almost immediately identified himself as the mayor of Pacific Grove. When Sandy and her friends expressed some skepticism, she said the man, in order to prove his point, pulled a wallet out of his pocket, flipped it open, and said, “No, really, here’s my badge.” Sandy said the badge looked to be a police badge and was contained in a leather wallet.

After returning his badge to his pocket, Fisher told Sandy that he likes to come to the Mission Ranch to drink because PG is basically a “dry” city. He also added that he likes to drive home through Pebble Beach to avoid the police on the highway. Their conversation ended when the ladies were seated at their table for dinner. Sandy characterized Fisher as a friendly, braggadocio type character with a badge.

So, the first-known official act of mayor Fisher and his new police-style badge was an attempt to impress four ladies in a bar in Carmel.

Court Rules In Favor Of Police Chief In Ramey Case

No donuts for Rhonda

Former parking enforcement officer Rhonda Ramey had sued the city, Hubbard, and Chief Miller on the grounds that her termination in January 2001 had been based on retaliatory motives for a harassment claim she had filed against her supervisors in late 1999.

Chief Miller testified that he fired Ramey for misappropriating two Volkswagen vehicles that she later converted to her own use, and for giving additional vehicles and extra business to a tow company operator named Kevin Shook. Miller said Ramey gave Shook a Mercedes Benz sedan and a Toyota van without properly processing the vehicles, which Shook subsequently sold for a profit. Official DMV documents associated with the Mercedes transaction had been forged, according to testimony in the trial.

Goldbeck Fires Letter To D.A. In Police Chief Firing

Cronies in Love. Fisher & Schenk

The letter, which was addressed to Terry Spitz in the Monterey County DA’s office, presented Goldbeck’s case for what she believes is a conspiracy orchestrated by Mayor Morrie Fisher to get rid of the chief so that his friend, Sergeant Richard Cox, could move up in the department.

Goldbeck also accused (Ron) Schenk of having “at least two meetings” with Cox at Schenk’s home while the officer was on duty. Later in the council meeting, Schenk admitted to being a friend of Cox, but claimed that the meetings were related to their positions on the board of their church and dealt with church business.

Developer Wants To Replace Holmans With Nine Story Hotel

Nadir is nuts. 600 hotel rooms added to our infrastructure is ridiculous.

At the January 28th meeting of the Economic Advisory Committee, Nader Agha (who owns the buildings on the downtown block bordered by Lighthouse, Grand, Central, and Fountain avenues) proposed a plan that includes a six-story hotel with 600 rooms for the front of the lot. The design incorporates Victorian era, Mission, and “Pacific Grove style” architecture.

There would be three additional stories of condominiums on top of this structure. Behind the hotel would be a two-story parking structure and 60,000 square feet of commercial space.

Protesters Line Up To Keep Public Comments

Meetings extending to the late night hours must be cutting into Morrie’s happy hour.

Snick Farkas Proposal To Limit Public Comments

Protesters rallied outside Pacific Grove City Hall before the opening of the January 15, 2003 city council meeting. Nineteen citizens spoke on the issue, all opposed to Mayor Morris C. Fisher’s recommendation to streamline meetings by moving oral communications to the end of the agenda.

“This isn’t, to me, a forum for someone to show a cartoon.” For a few other people we need to put a mirror outside and talk to the mirror.” Jim Costello: