Trees Vs Gravity On Pine St

Glad it did not fall on anyone like in the butterfly grove.

Pine ave

Chaikin admits she hadn’t thought much about the conditions of the city’s trees until a limb from a eucalyptus fell on her car on April 30, damaging its roof. After trying several times to reach someone at the city to report the matter, Chaikin said she ended up hiring an arborist to come survey the situation. She has since been in touch with the city.

Trees Vs Gravity On Pine St

Battle Over A Tree

On Wood street.

The removal plan was appealed by Gibson Avenue residents Saschja and Peter Marseguerra, who say the tree is “a unique and beautiful wonder of nature that we should respect, not kill.”

An arborist hired by a neighboring property owner concluded that removing the tree seemed “the most logical choice,” but said it could be preserved with pruning, support and annual monitoring.

A resident whose home is under the tree, in an email, called upon the city to remove the tree for safety reasons. A couple who live a few homes away wrote that the tree, if deemed truly dangerous, should be removed, but it would be best to save it if possible.

I know, move the tree to the yard where it can be respected.

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Battle Over A Tree

Plant More Eucalyptus!

Bob Pacelli’s tree project appears to be a smart thing to do.

Among his recommendations for the sanctuary are placing eucalyptus trees for more wind shelter and “habitat complexity,” trimming hazardous trees, planting more oak trees and assessing older trees and pitch canker risks of Monterey pines on the property.

Even though they are native to Australia and have nothing to do with the monarch’s historic habitat, Weiss said it was critical for the city to plant new blue gum eucalyptus trees along the southern row of the grove — and he said it should be done in February and March after the monarchs leave.

Plant More Eucalyptus!

Tree Rules Cut Down. You Can Learn A Lot From A Moron

Stumped

The changes would allow private property owners to replace cut-down trees with suitable trees listed by the city’s Natural Resources Committee as appropriate, though not necessarily the same species as those lost, and eliminate the “two-for-one” replacement requirement.

They hold the city to a higher standard of replacing trees, Frutchey said, noting Pacific Grove hasn’t kept up with the loss of trees on public property. Schematics included in the ordinance proposal noted a decline in the city’s tree canopy cover from 33 percent to 20 percent of its land area since 1986.

Tree Rules Cut Down. You Can Learn A Lot From A Moron

Decriminalizing Tree Removal – Thom's Tree Posse Loses Their Badges

Killer tree

A revised tree ordinance that would do away with criminal penalties could come before the Pacific Grove City Council for approval next spring.

The ordinance would offer incentives for property owners to plant and maintain trees and would allow private property owners to pay to trim city trees.

Decriminalizing Tree Removal – Thom’s Tree Posse Loses Their Badges

City Council Candidates In Lock Step On Issues

Same old blah blah blah. More taxes, change the tree policy, high cost desalinization, more development.

As the date comes near, I’ll be asking some tougher questions such as where they stand on the chicken control issue.

Four candidates for three four-year terms on the Pacific Grove City Council showed few areas of disagreement at a forum Tuesday at Chautauqua Hall that drew an audience of 50.

Incumbent Councilmen Ken Cuneo and Alan Cohen, and challengers Rudolph Fischer and Richard Ahart Jr., who will face off in the Nov.2 municipal election, answered written questions submitted by the audience on a number of city issues.

City Council Candidates In Lock Step On Issues

Tree Posse Gets Neutered

Common sense comes to the tree policy – we can learn a lot from a ‘moron’.

Stumped

The proposals include measures to give more discretion about tree pruning and removal to property owners, and allow them to have a tree expert determine whether a tree is sufficiently unhealthy to cut down, rather than leaving that decision up to city officials.

They also call for an end to criminal penalties and limit any penalties to civil fines.

Tree Posse Gets Neutered

Tree Posse Told To Back Off

Killer tree

Resident that was once called a “moron” by the runaway mayor Dan Cort is authoring the revision in the city’s policy on tree removal.

“I want to be safe in my own yard,” said Del Monte Park-area resident Georgia Booth, who was a founder of Residents for Responsible Change and co-author of a proposed revision of the tree ordinance — which got a lot of votes from workshop participants. “Large canopy trees don’t belong in small Pacific Grove yards.”

Eliminating the two-for-one replacement requirement was a top vote-getter, as were proposals that property owners, not the city, decide when a hazardous tree should be removed, that no permit fee for it should be charged, and that property owners who plant a tree may remove it
without a permit.

Tree Posse Told To Back Off

Tree Removal Reform

Remember the lady that Dan Cort called ‘moron’ over challenging the tree policy?

They argue that the city’s authority to regulate tree planting should be limited to the public spaces it owns and maintains: greenbelts and parks.

“From Eardley to First,” said resident Michael Clark, “is a solid hedge of trees. One of the treasures of the city is its views.”

Michael Clark is a bit blind – a low row of neatly trimmed oaks and one lopped eucalyptus fill the strip between those streets. Is Clark referring to the views of trees or the view from his vinyl clad windows?

Lorena Bobbit tree

ow!

Tree Removal Reform

Tree Cutting Could Have Caused Monarch Decline

A thinning canopy of trees may be a factor in the reduced numbers of monarch butterflies visiting the Pacific Grove sanctuary, two scientists told the City Council last week.

The council voted unanimously to direct City Manager Thomas Frutchey to convene a meeting of interested parties on the butterfly issue, engage Weiss to update and expand the sanctuary management plan, and direct the city’s Natural Resources Commission to oversee the plan update. No meeting date has been set.

With our city on the job, the best they can come up with is spending about $80,000 on a shuttle bus to bring butterflies over from Santa Cruz.

Butterfly tree stump

Tree Cutting Could Have Caused Monarch Decline